THE PLAINS

Chris R-1-70 Image by Christine Renney

Davis missed the road. More accurately, he missed the discipline it had provided. He no longer expected it to re-appear. Davis wasn’t searching for the road. In fact, he believed that if he was to find the centre then it was necessary to leave the road behind, abandon it and this hadn’t proved difficult. No roads had survived on the plains.
But the evidence that they had once been prevalent was everywhere. Much of it was unused and un-useable and Davis realised that, in order to take what they need, he and the others had to keep coming back, to sift through it.
The roads were redundant and the idea of starting in one place and making for another, of heading toward a destination, was futile. Grudgingly Davis had to admit it was fitting the roads hadn’t survived out on the plains. That they were no longer a part of this landscape, that the landscape had changed. It was even flatter than before, and even more barren, apart from the debris of course. And yet Davis still missed the road. He considered creating one of his own by using the now useless or unnecessary things. He could build a kerb or a bank or even a wall, building on either side of him as he walked.

5 thoughts on “THE PLAINS

  1. Even when that which holds us back (the road) is gone, and the opportunity to re-build is open, we long to re-create what was lost – the familiar.
    As ever haunting, disturbing and excellently written, Mark.
    Love the photograph too. Is it tree bark? Looks like an ariel view of a weird landscape!

    1. That’s a wonderful comment Chris. Thank you so much. It isn’t tree bark but plastic covering on a wall that’s starting to split and wear.

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